Portfolio > Last Action Hero (2015)

Last Action Hero (Nightmare)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
48 x 48 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (Olan Mills)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
60 x 40 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (goodbye)
Two Archival pigment prints mounted to Dibond
each 30 x 28 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (JFK)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
24 x 20 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (Jackie)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
19 x 13 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (Psycho)
Two Archival pigment prints mounted to Dibond
each 24 x 30 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (mom)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
20 x 16 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (couple)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
25 x 50 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (Rob)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
29 x 42 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (group pic)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
28 x 80 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (Lincoln's death)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
32 x 57 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (Craigslist)
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
30 x 42 in.
2015
Last Action Hero (Adrienne)
Two Archival pigment prints mounted to Dibond
each 13 x 19 in.
2015
The Last Rendezvous
Archival pigment print mounted to Dibond
25 x 40 in.
2014

Exhibition Dates:
July 16-September 12, 2015
Museum of Contemporary Art-Georgia

Inspired by the 1993 Arnold Schwarzenegger movie of the same name, P. Seth Thompson’s Last Action Hero explores narrative as both illusion and truth. In the film, Schwarzenegger plays an archetypal action star as well as a fictionalized version of his own Self. The duality of this role creates a space where the audience becomes cognizant of Schwarzenegger’s own mythological existence. He is both a heroic illusion in the “real” and cinematic world.

By digitally altering personal and historical images, the installation Last Action Hero reconstructs Thompson’s memories as a nonlinear timeline of events. Each photograph is seen as an illusion that illustrates the post-postmodern view of our technological landscape.

As digital imagery permeates our world, reality becomes secondary to the intrinsic desire to manipulate it into a story. We become archetypes in our own film, altering the truth in order to be the hero and not the villain.